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The Right Price to Pay for Flooring

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Gaspars.com

When planning to do a floor renovation, most homeowners are concerned about the cost. Nowadays, there are so many flooring options to choose from that it can be hard to figure out what the right price is for each type. You don’t want to pay for an inferior product, but want a good deal for great flooring. For the average consumer, it’s not that easy to differentiate a good deal from a bad one.

Below are three of the most popular flooring choices: carpet, tile and hardwood, and what is the right price to pay for each of them:

Carpet

Carpet is priced per square yard or square foot. While average carpet prices start at $2 a square foot, middle-grade quality ranges from $3 to $4 a square foot. Expect to pay about $5 or more per square foot for designer or high-grade quality carpet.

When installing carpet, you also have to consider additional costs like padding. Padding can cost about $2.50 to $6 per square foot. Don’t get fooled by free padding promotions, which are usually cheaply made, thin and often results in consumers paying for an upgrade.

Tile

Because of its durability, various styles, and reasonable prices, tile flooring is a popular choice among homeowners. One thing to note is that tile prices vary widely, from $1 per square foot up to more than $25, depending on the type.

For example, glazed ceramic tiles start around $1 per square foot, while porcelain, marble and granite tiles start at $2 per square foot. The most expensive type of tiles includes mosaic, glass, leather and metal, which can run up to $25 per square foot.

Expect to pay $6 to $6.50 per square foot for tile installation. Anything lower than these prices should raise a red flag. Cheap labor costs may mean that your installers do not have the proper training, qualifications and experience you are expecting, resulting in improper installation and cracked tiles in just a couple of years.

Hardwood

Hardwood floors are usually a luxurious choice for homeowners. This type of flooring is beautiful, but can be hard to maintain. The cheapest hardwood can start from $2 a square foot and go up to $30 or more for the high end.

A popular type of hardwood is called engineered hardwood, which is much more durable and affordable than solid wood floors. Expect to pay about $8 per square foot for engineered hardwood flooring and an additional $2 per square foot for installation.

Need more flooring advice? Call us at (626)-572-2866 and we’ll be happy to help you! You can also get more flooring ideas from our Pinterest and Instagram.

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Types of Tile: Pros and Cons

Today, it’s easy to see that there are numerous options to choose from when it comes to tile flooring. Within those options, there are also different price points and styles that can make it feel really overwhelming to decide just which type of tile is right for your space. Don’t let the wide selection of tile flooring overpower your chance to show your personality through design. In fact, you’ll find that while there are many types of tile to choose from, reviewing their pros and cons will help you narrow down to the ideal tile choice that will suit your space, style and budget.

Below is a list of the most common types of tiles as well as their advantages and disadvantages:

Source: ConsumerReports.org

sidebar-ceramicCeramic

Price: $2 to $7 per square foot

What is it? A mix of clay, minerals, and water, ceramic tiles are fired at high temperatures. Glazed styles are then treated with a liquid glass coating and fired again, creating a hard, stain- and scratch-resistant surface. Unglazed tiles are sometimes referred to as “quarry” tiles.

Best for: Ceramic tile is typically affordable, durable, easy to install and comes in a nearly endless array of colors and designs.

But: Colors can vary from lot to lot and ceramic is not ideal for high impact areas. Handmade or “art” tiles can be extremely pricey.

 

images-4Porcelain

Price: $3 to $7 per square foot

What is it? Porcelain tile is a type of ceramic tile that is fired at a higher temperature than standard ceramic, making it denser and less porous.

Best for: Use stain- and impact-resistant porcelain tiles on floors, walls, backsplashes. It’s easy to clean and comes in a wide variety of styles.

But: It requires a special setting material designed to adhere non-porous materials—DIYers often buy the wrong one. Check with the manufacturer to be sure you’re using the recommended adhesive.

 

floor-markerGlass

Price: $7 to $30 and more per square foot

What is it? Thin pieces of glass sold individually or as a mosaic, sometimes with other types of tile, on a mesh backing.

Best for: Colorful, reflective, easy-to-clean glass tile is best for walls and backsplashes. Some glass tile is rated for use on floors. The wide range of colors gives glass tile great “wow” factor.

But: It can be expensive and difficult to install. Because the tiles are transparent, the adhesive is visible through the tile. Unless you’re highly skilled, getting professional-looking results is difficult for a DIYer.

 

cement_tile_satin_finishCement

Price: $9 to $17 per square foot

What is it? Handmade of natural materials, cement tiles—also known as encaustic or Cuban tiles in the U.S.—typically boast bold patterns.

Best for: Resilient and beautiful, cement tiles are appropriate for floors, backsplashes and walls.

But: They’re pricey and not as common as other tiles, so your installer may not be used to working with them. Also, cement tiles are prone to etching by acid or harsh detergents and must be sealed on installation and resealed periodically.

 

f011dd5d0e28438b_4303-w640-h454-b0-p0--traditional-wall-and-floor-tileStone

Price: $6 to $15 per square foot

What is it? Pieces of natural stone—granite, slate, travertine, marble, onyx, sandstone, to name a few—cut into thin, regular pieces, stone tile has a rich, one-of-a-kind look.

Best for: Use stone on walls, backsplashes, or floors. Get the look of a granite countertop for less by using granite tiles instead of a slab.

But: Most stone tile can be damaged by exposure to water, pigment, or acid, so be prepared for extra maintenance. Seal on installation and reseal every 10 years.

Need more help deciding which type of tile is right for your home or business? Contact us or visit us at our Design Center today!